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The care of captive wildlife is not a small undertaking. A rehabilitator determines and treats the animal’s problem, houses it, feeds it and attends to its general well being. It must be observed, monitored, and prepared for release.

Good information and reliable resources help us deliver the best possible care.

The information in this section has been peer reviewed; only professional or university websites are included in the links areas; other information is published research or material reprinted with permission. Information has been classified taxonometrically.

There is no substitute for professional care. A trained wildlife rehabilitator has the knowledge and resources necessary to ensure a wild animal has its second chance at life. In most countries of the world, it is illegal for non-permitted/licensed individuals to possess, handle or treat wildlife. If you have found an animal that needs help, please do what is best for it and contact your local rehabilitation centre.

One can easily imagine how much money and effort we would be willing to devote to preserve an animal species on the moon if the astronauts had found one. No species on earth is less precious. No effort should be spared to save unique and irreplaceable products of millions of years of evolution with which our small planet has been endowed.

U Thant (1909-1974)
Secretary-General
United Nations